U.S. District Judge Rejects Argument that Sale of “Stand-In” Tokens Was Not a Sale of Unregistered Securities

On January 8, 2021, Judge Richard Seeborg of the United States District Court for the Northern District of California issued an Order denying a motion to dismiss in S.E.C. v. NAC Foundation, LLC, et al.  The U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) had previously filed a civil complaint against blockchain development company NAC Foundation, LLC (NAC) and NAC’s CEO, Marcus Rowland, alleging that NAC’s and Rowland’s sale of “stand-in” digital tokens constituted a fraudulent and unregistered sale of digital securities.  The Department of Justice (DOJ) brought a parallel criminal proceeding, alleging violations of federal wire fraud and money laundering statutes.  DOJ also filed a separate criminal case against former high-profile lobbyist Jack Abramoff in connection with his role in the promotion of NAC’s digital assets.

Continue reading “U.S. District Judge Rejects Argument that Sale of “Stand-In” Tokens Was Not a Sale of Unregistered Securities”

The U.S. Department of Justice Releases its Cryptocurrency Enforcement Framework

Earlier this year, the U.S. Department of Justice (“DOJ”) released its highly anticipated Cryptocurrency Enforcement Framework (the “Framework”).  The Framework was developed as part of the Attorney General’s Cyber-Digital Task Force, and contains three sections:  (1) Threat Overview; (2) Law and Regulations; and (3) Ongoing Challenges and Future Strategies.

Continue reading “The U.S. Department of Justice Releases its Cryptocurrency Enforcement Framework”

CFTC Enforcement Division Reports Most Active Year to Date

On December 1, 2020, the U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) Division of Enforcement released its Annual Report, which details a “record-breaking” fiscal year 2020 (“FY 2020”), despite the challenges presented by the COVID-19 pandemic.

Notably, the CFTC filed a historic 113 enforcement actions—up from 69 filed in FY 2019, 83 filed in FY 2018, and an increase over the previous high of 102 filed in FY 2012. The chart below shows the breakdown of enforcement actions by category, and Appendix B of the Annual Report provides individual case citations.

Continue reading “CFTC Enforcement Division Reports Most Active Year to Date”

After a Year of Record-Breaking Enforcement Fines, the CFTC Provides Guidance on the Recognition of Cooperation

Weeks after touting its record-breaking enforcement haul, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) Enforcement Division issued a memorandum providing guidance for enforcement staff to use when recommending the recognition of cooperation, self-reporting and remediation during the enforcement process. The historic enforcement performance demonstrated that the CFTC can wield a large stick, but the latest guidance is aimed at recognizing efforts in resolving violations.

Continue reading “After a Year of Record-Breaking Enforcement Fines, the CFTC Provides Guidance on the Recognition of Cooperation”

SEC Settles Enforcement Action against Private Equity Firm for Beneficial Ownership Reporting Violations

On September 17, 2020, the SEC announced the imposition of a cease-and-desist order against private equity firm Welsh, Carson, Anderson & Stowe (Welsh Carson), an SEC-registered investment manager, in connection with alleged violations of reporting obligations under Section 13(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (Exchange Act).  The SEC alleged that Welsh Carson had failed to timely amend a Schedule 13D report – commonly known as a beneficial ownership statement – after its investment position changed from an intent to acquire and restructure a company to an intent to liquidate its entire position in the company.  In connection with the entry of the SEC’s cease-and-desist order, Welsh Carson agreed to pay a civil penalty of $100,000.

Continue reading “SEC Settles Enforcement Action against Private Equity Firm for Beneficial Ownership Reporting Violations”

SEC Issues New Risk Alert on “Credential Stuffing” Attacks

On September 15, 2020, the SEC’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations (OCIE) issued a Risk Alert highlighting the recent uptick in “credential stuffing” cyber-attacks against SEC-registered investment advisors and broker dealers.

Credential stuffing is an automated cyber-attack on Internet-based user accounts and firm networks. Attackers obtain usernames and passwords from the dark web and then employ automated scripts utilizing the compromised information to attempt to log in and gain unauthorized access to other customer accounts and firm networks. Credential stuffing has proven to be a more effective way for hackers to gain access to accounts and firm systems than traditional brute force password attacks have been. If the credential stuffing attack is successful, attackers can gain access to and control over customer assets and confidential information.

Continue reading “SEC Issues New Risk Alert on “Credential Stuffing” Attacks”

The SEC’s Most Detailed Cybersecurity Guidance to Date

The SEC, through its Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations (“OCIE”), recently issued its most detailed cyber guidance to date. OCIE had previously issued several cybersecurity risk alerts over the past few years. This most recent release, however, offers much more than a risk alert. OCIE’s “Cybersecurity and Resiliency Observations” goes into significantly more detail than OCIE’s prior risk alerts in this area and is fashioned in a vastly different and more user-friendly format. Thus, it is required reading for SEC regulated entities because, rest assured, it will be closely followed and applied by OCIE staff conducting cyber examinations, as well as by the Division of Enforcement’s “Cyber Unit.”

Continue reading “The SEC’s Most Detailed Cybersecurity Guidance to Date”

DOJ and SEC Announce Charges Connected to Hack of SEC’s EDGAR System

Last week, the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) and the Securities & Exchange Commission (“SEC”) announced charges connected to a large-scale, international conspiracy to hack into the SEC’s Electronic Data Gathering, Analysis and Retrieval (“EDGAR”) system and profit by trading on stolen material, non-public information. The conduct underlying these cases was one of the principal reasons that the SEC created its Division of Enforcement “Cyber Unit” to target cyber-related securities fraud violations.

In a 16-count indictment unsealed in the United States District Court for the District of New Jersey, two Ukrainian citizens, Artem Radchenko and Oleksander Ieremenko, were charged with securities fraud conspiracy, wire fraud conspiracy, computer fraud conspiracy, wire fraud, and computer fraud. The SEC’s complaint charged nine defendants – Ieremenko, six traders in California, Ukraine, and Russian, and two entities – with antifraud violations of the federal securities laws.

The charging documents allege that Ieremenko and Radchenko hacked into the EDGAR system and stole thousands of files, including annual and quarterly earnings reports containing non-public financial information. The defendants gained access to the SEC’s networks by using a series of targeted cyberattacks, including directory traversal attacks, phishing attacks, and infecting computers with malware. The defendants extracted thousands of filings from the EDGAR system to a server they controlled in Lithuania. The defendants then profited by selling access to the stolen, confidential information and by trading on the stolen information prior to its distribution to the public. In total, the defendants and their co-conspirators are alleged to have traded before at least 157 separate earnings releases, and they generated over $4 million in illegal proceeds.

Some of the individuals charged in these cases were previously charged in connection with a similar scheme to hack into the computer systems of multiple newswire organizations and steal press releases containing financial information that had not yet been released to the public. Several of the same methods used to hack the newswire organizations were also employed to hack the EDGAR system.

The criminal and civil charges in these cases are a reminder that both DOJ and the SEC have prioritized combatting cybercrime and, in particular, network intrusions. They also serve as a stark reminder that any organization, even a U.S. government agency, can be targeted and victimized by cybercriminals. Companies and firms would be wise to examine the techniques used by the defendants in these cases and ensure that their own cyber defenses are sufficient to protect against and thwart similar attacks. For additional guidance, companies and firms can look to SEC guidance and actions issued since the creation of the SEC’s Cyber Unit.